2GB

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2GB was a radio station operated by the Theosophical Society in Australia.

Radio equipment was purchased by Karel van Gelder, father of Dora van Gelder Kunz, and set up in The Manor. That amateur effort at publicity grew into the commercial broadcasting station 2GB in 1926.[1]

In an account from 1934, George S. Arundale was Chairman of the Board, and Mr. A. E. Bennett was Managing Director.

From an original investment of $12,000 the broadcasting company has built up its assets to more than $90,000. Over $40,000 was spent in the course of the year for the provision of programs and broadcasting talent to maintain the high standards of program necessary to retain for the Theosophical Broadcasting Station its first-rank position.

It is operating as a substantial profit, of which $5,000 is set aside exclusively for theosophical propaganda.[2]

After Clara Codd lived in Australia 1934-1937, she wrote of 2GB,

By this time we had the most flourishing radio station in Australia. he Government owned the first-class stations, but private owners were allowed to hold what were called B-class stations. we had th most famous of all, Station 2GB. These letters stood for Giordano Bruno, a past incarnation of Dr. Besant... Under the leadership of one of our members who proved a genius in this respect, our station rose so high in public esteem that we could charge £1 a minute for advertisers.

The whole of the Sunday lecture in the Adyar Theatre was broadcast every week...

I also used to broadcast every afternoon from 2GB, a short little address on some Theosophical subject. Also sometimes in the evening, when I would often have the brother of Ronald Colman as my announcer...

The afternoon broadcasts, generally about four o'clock, when ladies were having afternoon tea, where of a lighter variety.[3]

Notes

  1. Frank Chesley and Kirsten van Gelder, A Most Unusual Life (Wheaton, Illinois: Quest Books, 2015), 62.
  2. "A Theosophical Business Enterprise" The American Theosophist 22.12 (December, 1934), 285.
  3. Clara Codd, So Rich a Life (Pretoria: Institute for Theosophical Publicity, 1956), 377-380.