Mahatma Letter No. 27

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Quick Facts
People involved
Written by: Morya
Received by: A. P. Sinnett
Sent via: unknown
Dates
Written on: unknown
Received on: October 1881
Other dates: none
Places
Sent from: unknown
Received at: Simla, India
Via: none

This is Letter No. 101 in Barker numbering. See below for Context and background.

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Envelope

M K. H. enclosure

27-0_Envelope_7162_thm.jpg

NOTES:

  • Other markings on the envelope are "C1" and the numbers 45 (circle) and 172.

Page 1 transcription, image, and notes

Received Simla, 1881.

Your letter received. I believe you had better try and see whether you could not make your ideas less polemical and dry than his. I begin to think there may be some stuff in you, since you are able so to appreciate my beloved friend and brother. I have attended to the Brahmin boy's letter and erased the offensive sentence replacing it with another. You can now show it to the Maha Sahib; him so proud in his bakbak humility and so humble in his pride. As

27-1_7163_thm.jpg

NOTES:

  • polemical means being argumentative or attacking a point of view.
  • Maha Sahib is here a reference to A. O. Hume.
  • bakbak is a Hindi word for “meaningless conversation”; chit-chat.

Page 2

for phenomena you will have none — I have written through Olcott. Blessed is he who knows our Koothoomi and blessed is he who appreciates him. What I now mean you will understand some day. As for your A.O.H. I know him better than you ever will.

M.

27-2_7164_thm.jpg

NOTES:

Context and background

Physical description of letter

The original is in the British Library, Folio 3. According to George Linton and Virginia Hanson, the letter was written:

In bright red ink, in a medium sized scrawl on both sides of a single sheet of very heavy rough paper with uneven edges, about 4" X 6" [10.2 X 15.2 cm] in size. The initial "M" at the end does not have the usual "tail." The letter is typical of M's brusque manner, having no salutation or complimentary closing.[1]

Publication history

Commentary about this letter

Notes

  1. George E. Linton and Virginia Hanson, eds., Readers Guide to The Mahatma Letters to A. P. Sinnett (Adyar, Chennai, India: Theosophical Publishing House, 1972), 76.


Additional resources