Mahatma Letter to Hartmann - LMW 1 No. 28

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Quick Facts
People involved
Written by: Koot Hoomi
Received by: Franz Hartmann
Sent via: unknown 
Dates
Written on: unknown
Received on: 1884
Other dates: unknown
Places
Sent from: unknown
Received at: Adyar
Via: unknown

This letter is Letter No. 28 in Letters from the Masters of the Wisdom, First Series. Mahatma Koot Hoomi writes to Franz Hartmann about the qualities of Damodar K. Mavalankar.[1]

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Page 1 transcription, image, and notes

Damodar has undoubtedly many faults and weaknesses as others have. But he is unselfishly devoted to us and to the ause, and has rendered himself extremely useful to Upāsika. His presence and assistance are indispensably necessary at the Headquarters. His inner self has no desire to domineer, though the outward acts now and then get that colouring from his excessive zeal which he indiscriminately brings to bear upon everything, whether small or great. It must, however, be remembered that, inadequate as our 'instruments' may be to our full purpose, they are yet the best available, since they are but the evolution of the times. it would be most desirable to have better 'mediums' for us to act through; and it rests with the well-wishers of the Theosophical Cause how far they will work unselfishly to assists in her higher work and thus hasten the approach of that eventful day. Blessings to all the faithful workers at the headquarters.

K.H.

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NOTES:

Context and background

Mr. Jinarajadasa provided these notes about this letter:

Transcribed from the original at Adyar. The letter was received by Dr. F. Hartmann at Adyar in 1884, when both the Founders were in Europe. D. is evidently D. K. Mavalankar.[2]

Physical description of letter

The original of this letter is preserved at the Theosophical Society, Adyar, Chennai, India.

Publication history

This letter was published in 1919 as Letter 28 in the first edition of Letters from the Masters of the Wisdom, 1881-1888, later known as the First Series.[3] It has kept this designation as Letter 28 throughout all editions.

Commentary about this letter

Additional resources

Notes

  1. C. Jinarajadasa, Letters from the Masters of the Wisdom, First Series (Adyar, Chennai, India: Theosophical Publishing House, 2011), 69, 160.
  2. C. Jinarajadasa, 160.
  3. Letters from the Masters of the Wisdom, 1881-1888. Adyar, Madras, India; London: Theosophical Publishing House, 1919. Foreword by Annie Besant; transcribed and compiled by C. Jinarajadasa.