Avastha

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Avastha (devanāgarī: अवस्था avasthā) is a Sanskrit word that means "state," and it is frequently applied to the three (o four) states of consciousness described in Hinduism known as jāgrat (waking state), svapna (dreaming state) and suṣupti (deep sleep state). A fourth state of consciousness is turīya (literally, "the fourth"), which is normally regarded as a spiritual state of pure consciousness.

Jagrat

In Indian philosophy jāgrat is the waking state of consciousness, with external, sensual, experience. In this state the same universe with its laws is presented to all.

H. P. Blavatsky defined it as follows:

Jagrata (Sk.). The waking state of consciousness. When mentioned in Yoga philosophy, Jagrata-avastha is the waking condition, one of the four states of Pranava in ascetic practices, as used by the Yogis.[1]

Svapna

In Indian philosophy svapna is the dreaming state of consciousness, with internal mental experience, where everyone fashions his or her own world.

H. P. Blavatsky defined it as follows:

Svapna (Sk). A trance or dreamy condition. Clairvoyance.[2]
Svapna Avasthâ (Sk.). A dreaming state; one of the four aspects of Prânava; a Yoga practice.[3]

Sushupti

In Indian philosophy suṣupti is the dreamless state of deep sleep, where there are no objects of which to be conscious.

H. P. Blavatsky defined it as follows:

Sushupti Avasthâ (Sk.). Deep sleep; one of the four aspects of Prânava.[4]
The Sushupti, or causal state [is] produced by, and through Karanopadhi, or what we call Buddhi.[5]

Turiya

In Indian philosophy turīya is a state where there is union with Brahman.

H. P. Blavatsky defined it as follows:

Turîya (Sk.). A state of the deepest trance—the fourth state of the Târaka Râja Yoga, one that corresponds with Âtmâ, and on this earth with dreamless sleep—a causal condition.[6]
Turîya Avasthâ (Sk.). Almost a Nirvânic state in Samâdhi, which is itself a beatific state of the contemplative Yoga beyond this plane. A condition of the higher Triad, quite distinct (though still inseparable) from the conditions of Jagrat (waking), Svapna (dreaming), and Sushupti (sleeping).[7]

Notes

  1. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, The Theosophical Glossary (Krotona, CA: Theosophical Publishing House, 1973), 162.
  2. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, The Theosophical Glossary (Krotona, CA: Theosophical Publishing House, 1973), 314.
  3. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, The Theosophical Glossary (Krotona, CA: Theosophical Publishing House, 1973), 314.
  4. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, The Theosophical Glossary (Krotona, CA: Theosophical Publishing House, 1973), 314.
  5. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, Collected Writings vol. VII (Wheaton, IL: Theosophical Publishing House, 1987), 289.
  6. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, The Theosophical Glossary (Krotona, CA: Theosophical Publishing House, 1973), 345.
  7. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, The Theosophical Glossary (Krotona, CA: Theosophical Publishing House, 1973), 345-346.