Difference between revisions of "Mahatma Letter to Ramaswamier - LMW 2 No. 50"

From Theosophy Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
(Commentary about this letter)
 
Line 3: Line 3:
 
| writtenby        = [[Morya]]
 
| writtenby        = [[Morya]]
 
| receivedby        = [[S. Ramaswamier]]   
 
| receivedby        = [[S. Ramaswamier]]   
| sentvia          = unknown  
+
| sentvia          = unknown{{pad|10em}}
 
| header2 = Dates
 
| header2 = Dates
 
| writtendate      = 30 September 1882  
 
| writtendate      = 30 September 1882  
 
| receiveddate      = 30 September 1882
 
| receiveddate      = 30 September 1882
| otherdate        = none
+
| otherdate        = unknown
 
| header3 = Places
 
| header3 = Places
 
| sentfrom          = unknown
 
| sentfrom          = unknown

Latest revision as of 02:30, 21 October 2019

Quick Facts
People involved
Written by: Morya
Received by: S. Ramaswamier
Sent via: unknown 
Dates
Written on: 30 September 1882
Received on: 30 September 1882
Other dates: unknown
Places
Sent from: unknown
Received at: unknown
Via: unknown

This letter is Letter No. 50 in Letters from the Masters of the Wisdom, Second Series. In it, Mahatma Morya instructs S. Ramaswamier to take on the garb and manner of a Vedantin ascetic, and to convince the world of the existence of the Brotherhood of Adepts. Ramaswamier is also asked to convey a message to Colonel Olcott.[1]

< Prev letter in LMW 2  Next letter in LMW 2 >  

Page 1 transcription, image, and notes

Ramaswamier will don the robes of a regular Vedantin ascetic – even to the top-knot if necessary, and sent his useless clothes to Bombay. He must travel from town to town along the line to Allahabad, and preach Theosophy and Vedantism. Every one must know he is my chela, and that he has seen me in Sikkim. He must let Upasika know of his movements constantly, and finally join her at Allahabad – as also receive my orders through her. His whole aspiration and concern must be directed towards one aim – convince the world of our existence. To Olcott Sahib he will say verbally the following: My master, among other messages already delivered to whom they concerned, told me – say to my faithful son and worker, that great was his patience, but also great will be the reward. Tell him that he but too often mistakes Upasika. She is all he thinks her to be, and nothing what he suspects her of. Let him understand the riddle. She has never deceived him – only left him ignorant of many things in accordance with my orders. Henceforth, in order to facilitate his comprehension, let him know that whenever an order in delivered to him through her, it must be prefixed with the words “Chohan Rimbochey”; whenever these words are omitted, the order does not emanate from me but from her. Tell him to have faith, hope and trust. More anon. Dress yourself as a pilgrim from to-day, and tell your friends you have received direct orders from me – how or in what way it is no one’s business. lence, discretion and courage. Have my blessings upon your head, my good and faithful son and chela.

M.

IMAGE TO BE
ADDED

NOTES:

Context and background

Mr. Jinarajadasa provided this background information:

Received probably on September 28, 1881, when he saw a materialization of his Master at Crow’s Nest.

“Ramaswami” was his ordinary name, Iyer being the Brahminical caste ending. He had a secret name given to him at his “thread ceremony” which was Rama Bhadra, and it is by this sacred name he is here addressed as Rama B.[2]

Physical description of letter

Mr. Jinarajadasa wrote of the Ramaswamier letters:

I do not know where the original letters are now. He died in 1893, devoted as ever to his Master and the T.S..[3]

Publication history

Mr. Jinarajadasa wrote of the Ramaswamier letters:

In December, 1894, a son of his published the letters, with a facsimile of one of them, in an attack on the T.S. , which bore the title, "Isis Further Unveiled." I reprint the letters from this pamphlet.[4]

Commentary about this letter

Mr. Jinarajadasa added:

Mr. Ramaswamier did as ordered and four T.S. Lodges at . . . were founded by him on his way to Bombay after seeing his Master.[5]

Additional resources

Notes

  1. C. Jinarajadasa, Letters from the Masters of the Wisdom, Second Series (Adyar, Madras, India: Theosophical Publishing House, 1925), 93, 95-96.
  2. C. Jinarajadasa, 94.
  3. C. Jinarajadasa, 93.
  4. C. Jinarajadasa, 93.
  5. C. Jinarajadasa, 97.

[