Dzyu

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Dzyu, also spelled Dgiü or Dgyü, is a unidentified term, used by H. P. Blavatsky and the Mahatmas. Some Theosophical students identify it to the Tibetan term rgyus = knowledge, intelligence.[1] Mme. Blavatsky defined it as follows:

Dzyu is the one real (magical) knowledge, or Occult Wisdom; which, dealing with eternal truths and primal causes, becomes almost omnipotence when applied in the right direction. Its antithesis is Dzyu-mi, that which deals with illusions and false appearances only, as in our exoteric modern sciences.[2]

In the "Cosmological Notes" written by Mahatma M. he also relates Dgyu to real knowledge:

Real knowledge deals with eternal verities and primal causes. The unreal only with illusory effects.

Dgyü stands independent of the belief or unbelief of man. Dgyü-mi requires faith — rests on authority. . . . The Lhas or adept alone possesses the real, his mind being en rapport with the Universal Mind.

The Lhas has made the perfect junction of his soul with the Universal Mind in its fulness, which makes him for the time a divine being existing in the region of absolute intelligence, knowledge of natural laws or Dgyü.[3]
In The Secret Doctrine Dzyu is used in a more specific sense for "the expression of the collective Wisdom of the Dhyani-Buddhas".[4] In Stanza V. 2 it is stated that the Dzyu is the origin of Fohat.[5] This definition is also found in the Cosmological Notes: "Dgyü becomes Fohat when in its activity — active agent of will — electricity — no other name.[6]

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Notes

  1. See The Orthography of Dgyu or Dzyu at The Book of Dzyan Blog
  2. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, The Secret Doctrine vol. I, (Wheaton, IL: Theosophical Publishing House, 1993), 108.
  3. A. Trevor Barker, The Letters of H. P. Blavatsky to A.P. Sinnett Appendix II (Pasadena, CA: Theosophical University Press, 1973), 376.
  4. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, The Secret Doctrine vol. I, (Wheaton, IL: Theosophical Publishing House, 1993), 108.
  5. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, The Secret Doctrine vol. I, (Wheaton, IL: Theosophical Publishing House, 1993), 107.
  6. A. Trevor Barker, The Letters of H. P. Blavatsky to A.P. Sinnett Appendix II (Pasadena, CA: Theosophical University Press, 1973), 376.