Myalba

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Myalba comes from the Tibetan dmyal-ba (nyal-wa). In Tibetan Buddhism it is considered to be the hell realm, and sometimes more specifically the lowest of the hells. A place of dreadful punishment for the wicked, who are tormented there most cruelly. Equivalent to the Sanskrit naraka or avichi.

H. P. Blavatsky wrote:

Myalba (Tib.). In the Esoteric philosophy of Northern Buddhism, the name of our Earth, called Hell for those who reincarnate in it for punishment. Exoterically, Myalba is translated a Hell.[1]
Mme. Blavatsky explains that Myalba is the state of Avitchi on earth[2] to which some soulless men are condemned on this physical plane.[3]

Notes

  1. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, The Theosophical Glossary (Krotona, CA: Theosophical Publishing House, 1973), 219.
  2. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, Collected Writings vol. XII (Wheaton, IL: Theosophical Publishing House, 1980), 637.
  3. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, The Theosophical Glossary (Krotona, CA: Theosophical Publishing House, 1973), 45.