Point Loma

From Theosophy Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

ARTICLE UNDER CONSTRUCTION
ARTICLE UNDER CONSTRUCTION


Point Loma or Lomaland was a Theosophical community established in San Diego, California by Katherine Tingley and her followers in the Universal Brotherhood and Theosophical Society.

Establishment of the community

During Katherine Tingley's European Crusade in 1896, she met young Gottfried de Purucker in Geneva, Switzerland. He had lived in San Diego, and described the Point Loma peninsula to her. Tingley instructed E. A. Neresheimer and E. B. Rambo to purchase the property. The following year, she and her followers laid the cornerstone for the School for the Revival of the Lost Mysteries of Antiquity, or SRLMA.[1]

"Theosophists from both the United States and abroad were encouraged to move to Point Loma and become part of a great adventure in Theosophical living."[2]

Growth

In 1900, 95 people, including 37 children, were residing at Point Loma in tents while buildings were under construction. The only permanent structure was The Homestead, built as a sanitarium by Dr. Lorin F. Wood Sr. (1852-1943), which was used for indoor gatherings and as housing for TIngley and some others. Within ten years, the community had grown to 357. The adults of this group were considered to be "pioneers" and were revered by later residents for establishing the colony. [3] After 1911, the legal name of the community became Lomaland, although it was also known among the residents as "the Homestead" or "the Hill."

Facilities at Point Loma

Iverson L. Harris described the wide range of facilities that were built for the community:

In addition, however, the community grew to include living quarters for the five hundred or more residents who gathered there, as well as a refectory, bakery, stables, carpenter shop, smithy, machine shop, and facilities for the production of textiles and the tailoring of clothing. Orchards and vegetable gardens produced more than enough fruits and vegetables to supply the needs of the community, and the formerly barren slopes of Point Loma were soon covered with groves of eucalyptus and avocado. Even a publishing house was added to the colony's facilities, with a printing press and a bindery turning out a steady production of Theosophical books and tracts.[4]

Raja Yoga School

A school was indeed started, called the Raja Yoga school, mainly for the children of families living at Point Loma, and it was eventually expanded to include instruction from the primary grades through advanced graduate studies.

Later history

Accounts of life at Point Loma

George Cardinal LeGros wrote a poem about Point Loma:

A Point Loma Memory

They tell me that Point Loma is no more,
That all my friends have vanished from the Hill;
But, thinking of its pathways and the shore,
I close my eyes and see Point Loma still.

I hear the winds that cry along the sea,
I know again the skies of morning blue,
The meadows and the blossoms blowing free,
The words we said, the things we used to do.

They tell me all is gone, and yet somehow
The Glory that was Yesterday is there
Triumphant in a bright Eternal Now
That sparkles on the joy-enchanted air

As, one by one, we all go Home to rest
At old Point Loma in the Golden West.[5]

Photo gallery

Additional resources

Notes

  1. W. Michael Ashcraft, The Dawn of the New Cycle: Point Loma Theosophists and American Culture, (Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2002), 51.
  2. Iverson L. Harris, "Reminiscences of Lomaland: Madame Tingley and the Theosophical Institute in San Diego," The Journal of San Diego History 20.3 (Summer 1974),. See San Diego History web page.
  3. W. Michael Ashcraft, The Dawn of the New Cycle: Point Loma Theosophists and American Culture, (Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2002), 56.
  4. Iverson L. Harris, "Reminiscences of Lomaland: Madame Tingley and the Theosophical Institute in San Diego," The Journal of San Diego History 20.3 (Summer 1974),. See San Diego History web page.
  5. "Theosophical Articles and Verse - George Cardinal LeGros" on Scribd.com