The Deluge

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The Deluge - John Martin.jpg

In Theosophy

According to Mme. Blavatsky the Deluge is a universal tradition. There were several actual deluges, which were confused and recorded in traditional accounts as one.[1] She states that the one known by our culture happened 850,000 years ago:

The “Deluge” is undeniably an universal tradition. “Glacial periods” were numerous, and so were the “Deluges,” for various reasons. Stockwell and Croll enumerate some half dozen Glacial Periods and subsequent Deluges—the earliest of all being dated by them 850,000, and the last about 100,000 years ago. But which was our Deluge? Assuredly the former, the one which to this date remains recorded in the traditions of all the peoples, from the remotest antiquity; the one that finally swept away the last peninsulas of Atlantis, beginning with Ruta and Daitya and ending with the (comparatively) small island mentioned by Plato. This is shown by the agreement of certain details in all the legends. It was the last of its gigantic character.[2]

She also affirms that "the semi-universal Deluge, or Noah’s flood [is] a purely mythical rendering of old traditions."

In Christianity

In Hinduism

Notes

  1. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, The Secret Doctrine vol. II, (Wheaton, IL: Theosophical Publishing House, 1993), 141.
  2. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, The Secret Doctrine vol. II, (Wheaton, IL: Theosophical Publishing House, 1993), 141.