Claude Fayette Bragdon

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Claude Fayette Bragdon was an American architect, artist, writer, and publisher who was active in the Theosophical Society in America. He operated the Manas Press in Rochester, New York, and was the first publisher of P. D. Ouspensky's work, Tertium Organum.

Writings

Bragdon wrote excellent books about architecture, art, and Theosophy:

  • Architecture and Democracy. 1918. Available at Internet Archive.
  • The Beautiful Necessity: Seven Essays on Theosophy and Architecture. 1910. 109 p. Available at Internet Archive, Internet Archive, Hathitrust, Google Books, and Google Books.
  • Episodes from an Unwritten History. In 1910, an enlarged second edition was published.
  • Four Dimensional Vistas. 1916. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. Available at Internet Archive and Internet Archive.
  • Man the Square: a Higher Space Parable. 1912. 34p.
  • Oracle. 1921. 64 p. Portrait in frontispiece. Available at Internet Archive. Bragdon collected messages that had been received by his deceased wife Eugenie Julier Macaulay Bragdon via automatic writing. Some are epigrammatic personal messages, and others are prophetic.
  • A Primer of Higher Space (the Fourth Dimension). 1913. Rochester, NY: Manas Press. 78 p. Illustrated. Available at Internet Archive.
  • Projective Ornament. 1915. 78 p. Illustrated.
  • Self Education: An Address Given Before the Boston Architectural Club April the third 1909. 1910. Rochester, NY: Manas Press. 16 p. Available at Internet Archive.
  • Six Lectures on Architecture. 1917. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Scammon Lectures. Coauthors were Ralph Adams Cram and Thomas Hastings. Available at Internet Archive.
  • The Small Old Path. 1914. 2nd edition. available at Internet Archive, Internet Archive, Internet Archive, and Internet Archive.
  • Theosophy and the Theosophical Society. 1909

He also contributed to:

  • "The Language of Form".

Notes