Mahatma Letter No. 79

From Theosophy Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Quick Facts
People involved
Written by: Koot Hoomi
Received by: A. P. Sinnett
Sent via: probably Djual Khool
Dates
Written on: unknown
Received on: August 1882
Other dates: none
Places
Sent from: unknown
Received at: Simla, India
Via: unknown 

This is Letter No. 79 in The Mahatma Letters to A. P. Sinnett, 4th chronological edition. It corresponds to Letter No. 116 in Barker numbering. See below for Context and background.

< Prev letter chrono  Next letter chrono >  
< Prev letter Barker  Next letter Barker >

Envelope ????

A. P. Sinnett.

79-0_Cover_sheet_7215_thm.jpg

NOTES:

Page 1 transcription, image, and notes

My dear Friend,

I am tired and disgusted with all this wrangling to death. Please read this before giving it to Mr. Hume. If, as a debt of gratitude, he would exact but a pound of flesh, I would have naught to say — but a pound of useless verbiage is indeed more than even I — can stand!

Yours ever,

K. H.

79-1_216_thm.jpg


NOTES:

  • A pound of flesh refers to Shakespeare's play The Merchant of Venice, in which a lender insists on the harsh consequence of defaulting on a desperate bargain.

Context and background

Physical description of letter

The original is in the British Library, Folio 3. According to George Linton and Virginia Hanson, the letter was written:

On the front of an envelope 4" X 5" [10.2 X 12.7 cm] to A. P. Sinnett, in blue pencil. The envelope may have enclosed a letter to AOH which KH asked APS to read before sending it on to him.[1]

Publication history

Commentary about this letter

Notes

  1. George E. Linton and Virginia Hanson, eds., Readers Guide to The Mahatma Letters to A. P. Sinnett (Adyar, Chennai, India: Theosophical Publishing House, 1972), 134.