Mamo Chohan

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The Mamo Chohans are imperfect planetary spirits possessing destructive intelligence, being the opposites of the Dhyan Chohans with their pure intelligence. In a letter dictated to Helena Petrovna Blavatsky they were described by the Mahatma M. as:

Chohans of Darkness, not what they term devils but imperfect "Intelligences" who have never been born on this or any other earth or sphere no more than the "Dhyan Chohans" have and who will never belong to the "builders of the Universe," the pure Planetary Intelligences, who preside at every Manvantara while the Dark Chohans preside at the Pralayas.[1]
The Master M. claims that "these are the gods the Hindus and Christians and Mahomed and all others of bigoted religions and sects worship"[2] and adds:
No more can the Dhyan Chohans impede the work of the Mamo Chohans, for their Law is darkness, ignorance, destruction, etc., as that of the former is Light, knowledge and creation. The Dhyan Chohans answer to Buddh, Divine Wisdom and Life in blissful knowledge, and the Ma-mos are the personification in nature of Shiva, Jehovah and other invented monsters with Ignorance at their tail.[3]

Mamos in Tibetan Buddhism

The Mamos are one of the eight classes of demons or impure manifestations of consciousness often mentioned in Vajrayana texts. Mamos are particularly ferocious inhabitors of charnel grounds and are among the most feared malicious spirits of Tibet. When incited they can arouse all eight kinds demons to follow them in attack.[4]

In Vajrayana practice there is a practice involving the recitation of a chant known as Pacifying the Turmoil of the Mamos.

Notes

  1. Vicente Hao Chin, Jr., The Mahatma Letters to A.P. Sinnett in chronological sequence No. 29 (Quezon City: Theosophical Publishing House, 1993), ???.
  2. Vicente Hao Chin, Jr., The Mahatma Letters to A.P. Sinnett in chronological sequence No. 29 (Quezon City: Theosophical Publishing House, 1993), ???.
  3. Vicente Hao Chin, Jr., The Mahatma Letters to A.P. Sinnett in chronological sequence No. 29 (Quezon City: Theosophical Publishing House, 1993), ???.
  4. Judith Simmer-Brown, Dakini's Warm Breath the Feminine Principle in Tibetan Buddhism (Boston & London:Shambhala Publications, 2002), 57.


Further reading