Djual Khool

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Djual Khool (and several other spellings) was a chela of Mahatma K.H. at the beginning of the correspondence the latter and Mahatma Morya held with A. P. Sinnett and A. O. Hume. Variant spellings include Djual Khul, Gjual Khool, DK, or GK.

Biographical information

Little is known about Djual Khool's personal life. In the Mahatma Letters he is frequently referred to as the Disinherited, a nickname given him because he was disinherited by his family when he became a chela of the Mahatma K.H. He is also sometimes called Benjamin, in reference to the Biblical story in which Benjamin is the youngest of Jacob's twelve sons. Koot Hoomi referred to him as his "Alter Ego."

In the Mahatma Letters there are hints about his Tibetan nationality. For example, when comparing D.K.'s artistic abilities with those of H. P. Blavatsky, Master K.H. wrote: "He will never be able to produce such a picture [as that from H.P.B.], simply because he is unable to conceive it in his mind and Tibetan thought."[1] Master K.H. gives second reference to D.K. living in Tibet in the following sentence: "He never wrote one line but once, he says — for the last eleven years, except on such "double superfin glacé" made at Thibet."[2][3]

In September 1882 Master K.H. wrote that "he is no longer my [his] chela,"[4] perhaps indicating that he had taken a higher initiation.

Involvement with the Mahatma Letters

Signature of Djual Khool in Mahatma Letter No. 37
Signature of Djual Khool in Mahatma Letter No. 83,
given as "Gjual-Khool"

Djual Khool was used in a number of instances by Mahatma K.H. as intermediary to precipitate some of the letters he sent to Mr. Sinnett. Besides this, he wrote a few letters and notes and signed them with his name.

The first letter he wrote to Mr. Sinnett was after the Mahatma K.H. finished his long retreat. The letter was received in January, 1882, and was published as Mahatma Letter No. 37 (Barker no. 37). He also wrote a footnote (signed as Gjual-Khool) to an article to be published by William Oxley in The Theosophist. A copy of the footnote was sent by H. P. Blavatsky to Mr. Sinnett for him to make corrections before publishing it. It was received by him on August 1882. The footnote is currently published as Mahatma Letter No. 83 in the chronological edition of the The Mahatma Letters to A. P. Sinnett (Barker no. 125).

Another example was Mahatma Letter No. 84, in which he described the conditions under which a package would be delivered to Sinnett's house.

Alice Bailey

Nineteen of the books written by Alice Bailey are presented each beginning with a two page Extract of a Statement by the Tibetan which explains his early wish to remain anonymous during the period of authorship and presumably while certain training experiments were taking place. [5] [6] [7] On the last page of the final volume of A Treatise on the Seven Rays the author of these works confirms his identity as Djwhal Khul.

Alice Bailey reports that his English vocabulary was cumbersome at first but improved as they together worked out a suitable presentation style.[8] John Berges reports that a lexigraphic analysis of Alice Bailey's writings identifies three words of old English usage ( e'en, oft and anent ) that appear hundreds of times in the works attributed to the Tibetan but never in the books written by Alice Bailey without the Tibetan, except for one instance of anent which appears in an appendix authored by the Tibetan himself.[9] This supports the statement by Djual Khool that he had two European lives[10] and strongly suggests that one of them was in Elizabethan England.

Online resources

Notes

  1. Vicente Hao Chin, Jr., The Mahatma Letters to A.P. Sinnett in chronological sequence No. 92 (Quezon City: Theosophical Publishing House, 1993), ???.
  2. Vicente Hao Chin, Jr., The Mahatma Letters to A.P. Sinnett in chronological sequence No. 15 (Quezon City: Theosophical Publishing House, 1993), ???.
  3. * double superfin glacé means "double glazed superfine" in French, and probably refers to a kind of paper.
  4. Vicente Hao Chin, Jr., The Mahatma Letters to A.P. Sinnett in chronological sequence No. 85B (Quezon City: Theosophical Publishing House, 1993), 261.
  5. Alice A. Bailey, Letters on Occult Meditation, (New York NY, Lucis Publishing Company, 1950)
  6. Alice A. Bailey, Discipleship In the New Age Volume One, (New York NY, Lucis Publishing Company, 1972)
  7. Alice A. Bailey, Discipleship In the New Age Volume Two, (New York NY, Lucis Publishing Company, 1955)
  8. Alice A. Bailey, The Unfinished Autobiography, (New York NY, Lucis Publishing Company, 1951) 167
  9. John Berges. Hidden Foundations of the Great Invocation. Print. Northfield, New Jersey. Planetwork Press, 2000, page 41
  10. Alice A. Bailey, Discipleship In the New Age Volume Two, (New York NY, Lucis Publishing Company, 1955) 473