Svayambhu

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Svayambhu (devanāgarī: स्वयम्भू svayambhū) is a Sanskrit word meaning "self-manifested" or "created by its own accord." H. P. Blavatsky uses it as a name for the "universal spirit."[1] She wrote:

Svayambhû (Sk.). A metaphysical and philosophical term, meaning “the spontaneously self-produced” or the “self-existent being”. An epithet of Brahmâ.[2]

In the Cosmological Notes, Mahatma M. writes:

Swayambu occupies every part of space which itself is boundless and eternal, hence must be space in one sense. Swayambu becomes Purush when coming in contact with matter.[3]

Svayambhuva

The term svāyambhuva means something relating to or derived from svayambhū, the Self-existent. The first Root Manu on this Planetary Chain is called Svāyambhuva, interpreted as the "son of svayambhū.[4] Mme. Blavatsky wrote:

Swâyambhuva [is] the first of the Manus, who started from Swâyambhu, “the self-existent” hence the Logos, and the progenitor of mankind.[5]
Who was Manu, the son of Svâyambhuva? The secret doctrine tells us that this Manu was no man, but the representation of the first human races evolved with the help of the Dhyan-Chohans (Devas) at the beginning of the first Round.[6]

Notes

  1. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, The Secret Doctrine vol. I, (Wheaton, IL: Theosophical Publishing House, 1993), 52.
  2. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, The Theosophical Glossary (Krotona, CA: Theosophical Publishing House, 1973), 315.
  3. Vicente Hao Chin, Jr., The Mahatma Letters to A.P. Sinnett in chronological sequence No. LBS-Appendix II (Quezon City: Theosophical Publishing House, 1993), 509.
  4. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, The Secret Doctrine vol. II, (Wheaton, IL: Theosophical Publishing House, 1993), 311.
  5. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, The Theosophical Glossary (Krotona, CA: Theosophical Publishing House, 1973), 206.
  6. Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, Collected Writings vol. IV (Wheaton, IL: Theosophical Publishing House, 1988), 576.