Mahatma Letter No. 26

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Quick Facts
People involved
Written by: Morya
Received by: A. P. Sinnett
Sent via: unknown
Dates
Written on: unknown
Received on: October 1881 See below.
Other dates: none
Places
Sent from: unknown
Received at: Simla, India
Via: none

This is Letter No. 102 in Barker numbering. See below for Context and background.

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Page 1 transcription, image, and notes

Received Simla, 1881.

My dear young friend, I am sorry to differ from you in your last two points. If he can stand one sentence of rebuke be will stand far more than what you would have me alter. Ou tout ou rien — as my frenchified K.H. taught me to say. I have thought your suggestion No. 1 — good and have fully adopted it, hoping that you will not refuse some day to give me lessons of English. I had "Benjamin" stick a patch in the page, and made him forge my caligraphy while smoking a pipe on my back. Not having the right to follow K. H. I feel very lonely without my boy. Hoping to be excused for writing, and refusal, I trust you will not shrink from telling the truth, if need be, even in the face of the son of "a member of Parliament." You have too many eyes watching you to afford making mistakes now.

M.

26-1_7165_thm.jpg

NOTES:

  • Ou tout ou rien means "all or nothing" in French.

Context and background

Physical description of letter

The original is in the British Library, Folio 3. According to George Linton and Virginia Hanson, the letter was written:

In red ink on one side of a folded sheet of letter paper, with APS's name written on the reverse side. The writer ran short of space and crowded the writing close together near the bottom, with smaller letter, so that there was barely room in the corner for the initial "M".[1]

Publication history

Commentary about this letter

Notes

  1. George E. Linton and Virginia Hanson, eds., Readers Guide to The Mahatma Letters to A. P. Sinnett (Adyar, Chennai, India: Theosophical Publishing House, 1972), 75.


Additional resources