Mahatma Letter to H. S. Olcott - LMW 2 No. 19

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Written by: Serapis Bey
Received by: Henry Steel Olcott
Sent via: unknown 
Dates
Written on: unknown
Received on: June-August 1875
Other dates: unknown
Places
Sent from: unknown
Received at: unknown
Via: unknown

This is Letter No. 19 in Letters from the Masters of the Wisdom, Second Series. In it Mahatma Serapis Bey advises Henry Steel Olcott on development of spiritual qualities.[1] Letters 9-20 of this series are closely related.


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Page 1 transcription, image, and notes

Know, O Brother mine, that where a truly spiritual love seeks to consolidate itself doubly by a pure, permanent union of the two, in its earthly sense, it commits no sin, no crime in the eyes of the great Ain Soph|Ain-Soph]], for it is but the divine repetition of the Male and Female Principles – the microcosmal reflection of the first condition of Creation. On such a union angels may well smile! But they are rare, Brother mine, and can only be created under the wise and loving supervision of the Lodge, in order that the sons and daughters of clay might not be utterly degenerated, and the Divine Love of the Inhabitants of Higher Spheres (Angels) towards the daughters of Adam be repeated. But even such must suffer, before they are rewarded. Man’s Atma may remain pure and as highly spiritual while it is united with its material body; why should not two souls in two bodies remain as pure and uncontaminated notwithstanding the earthly passing union of the latter two. . .

SERAPIS



EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS:

(A) THE law of compensation can reward but those who have resisted the cruel stings of earth-born desires. Where there is no temptation, the merit of withstanding its feeble voice is null and cannot claim its reward.

(B) We fear but whom we hate or love. We avoid but those who repulse us or attract us too much. We never avoid those for whom we feel indifferent.

(C) . . . the greatest of all living crimes – Suicide.

(D) Understand how great, how sublime is the role of one, through whom thousands of minds are enlightened, their faith strengthened, and the immortal happiness of future life warranted and proved by the best scientific minds with mathematical exactitude.

IMAGE TO BE
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NOTES:

  • sons and daughters of clay and daughters of Adam refer to human beings.

Context and background

Mr. Jinarājadāsa provided this background information on the series of letters numbered 9-20:

The letters which follow, all written by the Master Serapis, deal with certain incidents in the life of H.P.B., of which there has been scarcely any mention. Colonel Olcott describes in Old Diary Leaves the Philadelphia marriage of H.P.B., but evidently he has forgotten the true reason for it, for the account he gives of H.P.B.’s explanation of it differs from that given by the Master S. The man whom H.P.B. married was little better than a workman. He had lately come to America from Tiflis in Russia, and had built up a small business as an importer and exporter. He was sincerely drawn to Spiritualism, and evidently in the beginning was desirous of helping H.P.B. to carry out her great schemes to found a spiritual philosophy. On the strict understanding that his privileges as husband would only consist in making a home for her, so that she might carry out the plan of the Brotherhood, H.P.B. married him, though a woman of her aristocratic nature must have felt intensely humiliated to be linked to such a peasant. There was a stipulation that, even though married, she should retain her own name of Blavatsky. After H.P.B. left him, he obtained a decree of divorce, so that when she started for India, the sad incident of the second marriage was utterly closed...[2]

Physical description of letter

The original of this letter is preserved at the Theosophical Society, Adyar, Chennai, India. Mr. Jinarājadāsa wrote:

Five of the letters of the Master Serapis were received through the post, and their envelopes still remain, and bear the postmark. Four of them were posted in Philadelphia and one in Albany. Colonel Olcott received them in New York at his house, or in Boston care of the Postmaster. Seven of the letters are written on green paper with black ink.[3]

Publication history

Commentary about this letter

Mr. Jinarājadāsa provided this commentary:

Throughout these letters about H.P.B., there are several references to the “Dweller on the Threshold.” This mysterious phrase occurs in Zanoni. It is evident that challenging the Dweller, and risking one’s very existence in the process, is one of the trials of the Initiate. There is no clue in the letters showing of what type were the dangers which confronted H.P.B., so that her very life was at stake.

These letters to Colonel Olcott from the Master S. mention incidents in H.P.B.’s inner life. As none have a right to peer inquisitely into the workings of the soul, I have omitted all references to such incidents, extracting out of the letters only such teachings as seem to me to have value to earnest students.[4]

Additional resources

Notes

  1. C. Jinarājadāsa, Letters from the Masters of the Wisdom, Second Series (Adyar, Madras,India: Theosophical Publishing House, 1925), 41-43.
  2. C. Jinarājadāsa, 21.
  3. C. Jinarājadāsa, 22.
  4. C. Jinarājadāsa, 21-22.